BIRDS IN BEIJING

Beijing, 22 March 2014

A few days ago, as I was walking to work along my piece of canal, I saw, sitting on the lower branch of a willow tree, a small bird which I had never seen before. I’m not a birder by any means, but I do appreciate a beautiful or graceful bird when I see one. This bird had a wonderfully variegated plumage, really very handsome. By the shape of its head and bill I was guessing it to be a member of the woodpecker family. Intrigued, I sidled forward to have a better look. The bird cocked its head, kept a wary eye on me, and finally decided I had invaded too much of its private space. With a quick flip of its wings, it was off, dipping and lifting across the waters of the canal. I finally lost sight of it among the willow trees and buildings on the other bank.

The internet is a wonderful thing, really it is. Yes, there are dark corners where bad, nasty people show and say bad, nasty things, but overall it is a great global market square into which you can wander of an evening and, like young Marco Polo sauntering along Venice’s wharves, hear tales fantastical of faraway lands and pick up information from the furthest reaches of the globe. This burst of appreciation for the internet at this particular moment in my tale comes from the fact that at home that evening, on a whim, I typed “birds in beijing” in my search field to see what I could find. And I immediately stumbled onto the site Birding Beijing! I salute its author, Terry Townshend, a Beijing resident like myself and a dedicated birder, who has put together this wonderful site.

Terry’s site gave me the answer I was looking for. The bird I had seen in the morning was indeed a woodpecker, the great spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopos major) to be precise. This photo is from his site
great-spotted-woodpecker-small-1
Here is another from a UK site

great-spotted-woodpecker-2
which I chose because this woodpecker has a range which stretches all the way from China across Central Asia and Europe to my home country. It gives me an odd sense of comfort, that: part of home in Beijing.

Terry’s site gave me the answer to one more ornithological question which has been nagging me for the last few years, the identity of another bird which I have often seen here. It seemed to me quite like the magpie, although with much more delicate colouring in its feathers. It seemed to fill the same ecological niche, too, as far as I could gather. Well, Terry’s site tells me that it is indeed a magpie! (although a different member of the family, to be sure). It is the azure-winged magpie (Cyanopica cyanus). This photo of it is also from Terry’s site

azure-winged-magpie-1

but this one comes from a Russian orthinological site

azure-winged-magpie-2

which I include because the range of this magpie covers East and North-East Asia (so including Siberia).

I’m not sure “azure” really describes the wonderful shade of blue which this bird sports in its wing and tail feathers. A long hunt through various other internet sites makes me think that cornflower blue might better describe this particular shade of blue. The internet also tells me that this colour was one of the Dutch painter Jan Vermeer’s favourite colours. Is the blue in his painting Girl with a Pearl Earring the same?

Girl_with_a_Pearl_Earring

Perhaps it is a slightly darker shade of blue?

Flush from these two successful identifications, I went through the rest of the bird gallery in Terry’s site, to put a name to what else I’ve seen in Beijing. He mentions the the Eurasian magpie (Pica pica), which I’ve had cause to write about in an earlier posting. It seems more common than the azure-winged magpie; I certainly feel that I see it more often. Terry does not include a picture of this magpie (too common, no doubt), so I add here a photo from another site
Eurasian magpie-2
Terry mentions the Eurasian tree sparrow (Passer montanus). I’ve seen that, of course, who hasn’t?
tree-sparrow
I think I might once have seen another bird he mentions, the eastern great tit (Parus minor)
japanese-tit
I’m almost certain I also saw a Eurasian kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) once. I spotted it during a particularly boring teleconference for which I was a passive participant, sitting at my desk and staring out of the window while the others droned on.  I was glad for the lovely distraction of its diving and swooping around my office building.

kestrel

These wonderful photos move me to cite here three poems about birds which I particularly like:

The Eagle, by Alfred, Lord Tennyson

He clasps the crag with crooked hands;
Close to the sun in lonely lands,
Ring’d with the azure world, he stands.

The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls;
He watches from his mountain walls,
And like a thunderbolt he falls.

The Windhover, by Gerard Manley Hopkins

I caught this morning morning’s minion, king-
  dom of daylight’s dauphin, dapple-dawn-drawn Falcon, in his riding
  Of the rolling level underneath him steady air, and striding
High there, how he rung upon the rein of a wimpling wing
In his ecstasy! then off, off forth on swing,
  As a skate’s heel sweeps smooth on a bow-bend: the hurl and gliding
  Rebuffed the big wind. My heart in hiding
Stirred for a bird,—the achieve of; the mastery of the thing!

Brute beauty and valour and act, oh, air, pride, plume, here
  Buckle! AND the fire that breaks from thee then, a billion
Times told lovelier, more dangerous, O my chevalier!

No wonder of it: shéer plód makes plough down sillion
Shine, and blue-bleak embers, ah my dear,
  Fall, gall themselves, and gash gold-vermillion.

The Darkling Thrush, by Thomas Hardy

I leant upon a coppice gate
    When Frost was spectre-gray,
And Winter’s dregs made desolate
    The weakening eye of day.
The tangled bine-stems scored the sky
    Like strings of broken lyres,
And all mankind that haunted nigh
    Had sought their household fires.

The land’s sharp features seemed to be
    The Century’s corpse outleant,
His crypt the cloudy canopy,
    The wind his death-lament.
The ancient pulse of germ and birth
    Was shrunken hard and dry,
And every spirit upon earth
    Seemed fervourless as I.

At once a voice arose among
    The bleak twigs overhead
In a full-hearted evensong
    Of joy illimited;
An aged thrush, frail, gaunt, and small,
    In blast-beruffled plume,
Had chosen thus to fling his soul
    Upon the growing gloom.

So little cause for carolings
    Of such ecstatic sound
Was written on terrestrial things
    Afar or nigh around,

That I could think there trembled through
    His happy good-night air
Some blessed Hope, whereof he knew
    And I was unaware.

Lovely …

And yet I’m worried. Last Christmas, when we were in New York, we visited the Metropolitan Museum. On our wanderings through the galleries we bumped into four of these hanging on the wall of a corridor:

Peruvian-Featherwork-cape-1

They are capes, from Peru. They are 1,000 years old, made with the feathers of the blue-and-yellow macaw.

Blue-and-yellow Macaw

How many of these magnificent birds were killed to make these capes? Such needless, selfish destruction! Nowadays, it’s not killing for their feathers that’s killing off birds, it’s destruction of their habitat. But it’s still the same: needless, selfish destruction.

____________________

Great spotted woodpecker-1: http://birdingbeijing.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/great-spotted-woodpecker-small-1.jpeg [in http://birdingbeijing.com/birders-guide-to-beijing/a-guide-to-beijings-common-birds/%5D
Great spotted woodpecker-2: http://www.worldbirds.co.uk/images/oakes0/photos/image298.jpg [in http://www.worldbirds.co.uk/lesser_spotted_woodpecker.aspx?key=60%5D
Azure-winged magpie-1: http://birdingbeijing.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/2013-12-28-azure-winged-magpie.jpg [in http://birdingbeijing.com/birders-guide-to-beijing/a-guide-to-beijings-common-birds/%5D
Azure-winged magpie-2: http://onbird.ru/img/photo/golubaya-soroka/golubaya-soroka foto 4 (onbird.ru).jpg [in http://onbird.ru/opredelitel-ptic/golubaya-soroka-584/foto%5D
Girl with a pearl earring: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/ce/Girl_with_a_Pearl_Earring.jpg [in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johannes_Vermeer%5D
Eurasian magpie: http://birdsofkazakhstan.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Pica-pica-bactriana-adult-Zhabagly-South-Kazakhstan-province-Kazakhstan-16-September-2009-Rene-Pop2.jpg [in http://birdsofkazakhstan.com/eurasian-magpie-pica-pica/%5D
Tree sparrow: http://birdingbeijing.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/2013-10-03-tree-sparrow.jpg [in http://birdingbeijing.com/birders-guide-to-beijing/a-guide-to-beijings-common-birds/%5D
Japanese tit: http://birdingbeijing.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/2014-01-23-japanese-tit.jpg [in http://birdingbeijing.com/birders-guide-to-beijing/a-guide-to-beijings-common-birds/%5D
Kestrel: http://birdingbeijing.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/2009-09-14-kestrel2.jpg [in http://birdingbeijing.com/birders-guide-to-beijing/a-guide-to-beijings-common-birds/%5D%5D
Peruvian featherwork cape: http://www.thehistoryblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/470_Peruvian-Featherwork.jpg [in http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/27107%5D
Blue and yellow macaw: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6d/Blue-and-Yellow-Macaw.jpg [in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue-and-yellow_Macaw%5D

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Abellio

I like writing, but I’ve spent most of my life writing about things that don’t particularly interest me. Finally, as I neared the age of 60, I decided to change that. I wanted to write about things that interested me. What really interests me is beauty. So I’ve focused this blog on beautiful things. I could be writing about a formally beautiful object in a museum. But it could also be something sitting quietly on a shelf. Or it could be just a fleeting view that's caught my eye, or a momentary splash of colour-on-colour at the turn of the road. Or it could be a piece of music I've just heard. Or a piece of poetry. Or food. And I’m sure I’ve missed things. But I’ll also write about interesting things that I hear or read about. Isn't there a beauty about things pleasing to the mind? I started just writing, but my wife quickly persuaded me to include photos. I tried it and I liked it. So my posts are now a mix of words and pictures, most of which I find on the internet. What else about me? When I first started this blog, my wife and I lived in Beijing where I was head of the regional office of the UN Agency I worked for. So at the beginning I wrote a lot about things Chinese. Then we moved to Bangkok, where again I headed up my Agency's regional office. So for a period I wrote about Thailand and South-East Asia more generally. But we had lived in Austria for many years before moving to China, and anyway we both come from Europe my wife is Italian while I'm half English, half French - so I often write about things European. Now I'm retired and we've moved back to Europe, so I suppose I will be writing a lot more about the Old Continent, interspersed with posts we have gone to visit. What else? We have two grown children, who had already left the nest when we moved to China, but they still figure from time to time in my posts. I’ll let my readers figure out more about me from reading what I've written. As these readers will discover, I really like trees. So I chose a tree - an apple tree, painted by the Austrian painter Gustav Klimt - as my gravatar. And I chose Abellio as my name because he is the Celtic God of the apple tree. I hope you enjoy my posts. http://ipaintingsforsale.com/UploadPic/Gustav Klimt/big/Apple Tree I.jpg

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